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Top 10 female dog pee smells like fish You Need To Know

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Below is information and knowledge on the topic female dog pee smells like fish gather and compiled by the baonangluong.info team. Along with other related topics like: Dog peeing in house smells like fish, How to get rid of fishy smell from dog, Female dog in heat smells like fish, 10 week old puppy smells like fish, Fishy smell from anus male dog, Old dog pee smells like fish, Dog smells like fish in car, Why does my dog smell like fish when scared.


My Dog Smell Like Fish? 4 Reasons for a Fishy Odor

Why does my dog smell like fish? If you are pondering (or perhaps googling) this question, then you have come to the right place! Integrative veterinarian Dr. Julie Buzby helps you get to the bottom of your dog’s fishy odor and gives you some solutions that aren’t fishy—and can help your dog smell less fishy too.

Golden Retriever holding a small fish in its mouth.

Depending on your dog’s sense of adventure and level of hygiene, he or she can exhibit any number of odd odors that may lead you to sniff and exclaim, “What did you get INTO?” But one particular scent can be an indication that your dog may need a visit to the veterinarian.

Specifically, I’m talking about your dog smelling like fish. If your dog didn’t just roll in a dead fish (that you know of…) then he or she might have one of these four issues we are about to talk about. So let’s dive right in!

Fishy odor #1: Dental disease

Perhaps you’re wondering “Why does my dog’s breath smell like fish?” Assuming that your dog doesn’t normally eat fish or a fish-based kibble, fishy breath could be a sign of dental disease in dogs (i.e. periodontal disease).

It is estimated that 80% of dogs have some degree of periodontal disease by the age of two years. So there is a decent chance this is the culprit for your dog’s bad breath. Wondering why this is the case?

The reasons for periodontal disease in dogs

Well, first of all, dental health in animals is very strongly genetically linked. If your dog is one of those breeds predisposed to dental disease, or had parents with “bad teeth,” he or she probably has bad teeth too. This means your dog will most likely often have smelly breath. And he or she will require dental cleanings more often than other dogs.

Secondly, even the best trained dog can’t be responsible for his or her own oral health. If you don’t regularly brush your dog’s teeth, oral bacteria can go to town in your dog’s mouth. The end result is inflamed gums, your dog losing teeth, a painful mouth, and fishy breath.

Unfortunately, even if you never miss a day of brushing your dog’s teeth, sometimes it still may not be enough to completely combat the bacteria in your dog’s mouth. Those “bad teeth genetics” can’t just be brushed away. (But don’t get me wrong—brushing is still a very good thing).

Dog with a lot of tartar buildup on teeth, which is one reason a dog may smell like a fish
Dental disease can have a horrible fishy odor due to bacteria overload and decay.

So what can you do about your dog’s fishy breath?

A veterinary dental cleaning can give your dog fresh breath

Nothing can replace the effectiveness of a veterinary dental cleaning. By the time your dog has bad breath and severe periodontal disease, this is the best—and really the only—solution.

Let me hop up on my soapbox for a moment. I want to stress the word “veterinary” when it comes to dental cleaning. An “anesthesia-free dental” simply won’t cut it. In order to deal with your dog’s dental problems, most of which are hidden under the gumline, your dog needs to go under general anesthesia.

I know it can be scary to think about anesthesia. You might be wondering, “Is my dog too old for anesthesia?” But it really is the safest and most effective approach. Anesthesia allows your vet to take dental X-rays to evaluate the jaws and tooth roots, scale the teeth to remove tartar, polish them, and extract any diseased teeth. Without anesthesia, a dental cleaning is primarily limited to scraping the tartar off the visible surfaces of the teeth.

(To learn more, read the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) guidelines on nonanesthetic dentistry.)

At-home oral hygiene tips for dogs

After your dog’s veterinary dental cleaning, his or her mouth will be fresh and pain-free. From there, you can (and should) take steps to maintain your dog’s good oral health. This can help prolong the interval between veterinary dental cleanings. And as an added bonus, your dog’s slobbery kisses won’t remind you nearly as much of fish!

Some at-home dental care ideas include:

  • Brush your dog’s teeth with a canine enzymatic toothpaste at least three times per week. You should not use human toothpaste on dogs.
  • Offer your dog dental treats or chews. Your veterinarian’s office should have specific options that they recommend.
  • Consider water additives that help prevent the buildup of plaque.
  • Feed your dog a specifically formulated dental diet like Hill’s Prescription Diet t/d Dental Care, Purina Pro Plan Veterinary Diets DH Dental Health, or Royal Canin Dental Care. These diets are designed to “scrape” buildup off the teeth as your dog chews. (Please note that regular dry dog food does not scrape the tartar off teeth effectively.)
  • Ask your veterinarian at each wellness visit if they recommend a dental cleaning this year. It is best not to wait until your dog’s mouth is stinky and obviously diseased.
  • Choose safe chew toys for your dog to prevent fractured teeth.
A young girl applying toothpaste onto a toothbrush while holding a Golden Retriever puppy
Use canine enzymatic toothpaste when brushing your dog’s teeth – and start training early!

Fishy odor #2: Anal gland disease

Now let’s head to the other end of the dog. If you are wondering “Why does my dog’s butt smell like fish?”, anal sac disease is usually the most likely culprit. You see, every dog (and cat) has special glands that line the inside of the two anal sacs—one on each side of your dog’s anus. These anal glands produce an oily material unique to that particular dog, which is stored in the anal sac. When your dog sniffs another dog’s bottom, that’s the odor that they are sniffing for!

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Ideally, every time a dog poops, a tiny amount of this foul-smelling material is squeezed out of the anal sac onto the stool. This marks your dog’s poop as “his” or “hers” so that other dogs know who was there for territory identification. Occasionally, your pooch can also express the material when startled, scared, or extra relaxed. This is totally normal. However, it is pretty stinky if it happens frequently!

Before we go further, let me pause to clear up some terminology that can get confusing. As I just explained, a dog technically has anal glands and anal sacs. But most people just call the combination of both the dog’s “anal glands.” So for the purposes of this article, that is the term I will primarily use too.

The trouble with anal glands

When all is working according to plan, the anal glands are a great scent marker for communication. However, sometimes the “exit” hole to your dog’s anal glands can become closed off. This can happen for many reasons—allergies, stress, trauma, or even stool that is the wrong consistency. Even though the opening is closed, the gland continues to make the material. But there is nowhere for it to go, so the sac becomes swollen. Eventually, the anal glands can become impacted or abscessed.

If your dog has full anal glands, you will probably notice him or her scooting or dragging the rear end on the ground. (And inevitably it seems to happen in front of company or on that nice rug you just had steam cleaned.) The dragging or scooting is your dog’s way of trying to release the pressure from the anal glands.

If you spot your dog scooting, make an appointment at the veterinary clinic. There, the veterinarian can examine your dog to see if the anal glands need to be manually expressed. If the glands are just very full, this is typically a mildly uncomfortable procedure at most for the average dog.

A merle Dachshund sitting on a carpet and looking upwards.
Dogs with full or infected anal glands may scoot their bottoms on the carpet or other flooring.

However, if the glands are abscessed or impacted, this is a different story. Your dog may need sedation or anesthesia to clean out the glands. Plus, he or she may go home with pain medication and antibiotics to promote comfort and proper healing.

In cases of repeat anal gland issues, your veterinarian may eventually recommend an anal sacculectomy. This is a last-resort procedure where the veterinarian surgically removes the anal glands.

How to prevent anal gland problems in dogs

Luckily, there are a few things pet parents can do at home to hopefully prevent their dog from needing anal gland surgery or suffering from an impacted or abscessed anal gland.

  • Work with your vet to manage allergies, stool consistency issues, or other factors that are making it difficult for your dog to express the anal glands. Also, ask your vet to show you how to feel the glands at home to determine if they are getting too full.
  • Ask your groomer not to express your dog’s glands. Overexpressing the anal sacs can cause inflammation, scar tissue, and eventually the loss of your dog’s ability to express them normally.
  • Increase the bulk of your dog’s stool. Firmer stool is more efficient at expressing the glands normally. A few tablespoons of canned pumpkin for dogs with each meal is a great way to add dietary fiber without extra calories. Plus, dogs love the flavor!
  • Consider using one of the over-the-counter supplements available for dogs with repeated anal gland issues.

Fishy fragrance #3: Urinary tract infections

While anal gland problems are pretty common, they aren’t the only reason for a fishy aroma around a dog’s rear end. Perhaps instead you are asking yourself “Why does my dog’s pee smell like fish?” or “Why does my female dog smell like fish?”

Sometimes highly concentrated urine can be a bit strong smelling. But it does not usually spell a problem for your dog. On the other hand, urine that smells like fish can also point to a urinary tract infection (i.e. UTI in dogs) or a kidney infection (i.e. pyelonephritis in dogs). UTIs are more common in female dogs due to their shorter urethra. So a UTI could also be the explanation for a fishy-smelling female dog.

Cocker Spaniel sitting next to a urine puddle on the carpet to show that a UTI can have a fishy smell
UTIs can cause a significant fishy odor, especially if caused by specific bacteria. Accidents in the home may be another sign of UTI.

Especially if your dog is also urinating frequently, having urinary accidents, being a lethargic dog, or has bloody urine, you should make an appointment with your vet. Your dog may need antibiotics to combat the infection and keep his or her condition from worsening.

Strategies to reduce the frequency of UTIs

There also are some things you can do at home to help prevent future UTIs. They include:

  • Ensure your dog always has access to fresh, clean drinking water.
  • Allow your dog many opportunities to go outside to urinate so urine doesn’t sit in the bladder. Frequent urination can wash away bacteria that are traveling up the urethra. It also can flush out bacteria that made it to the bladder before they get a chance to set up an infection.
  • Consider having your vet periodically screen your dog for a UTI if your dog has a condition such as Cushing’s disease in dogs, kidney failure in dogs, or others that make a dog more prone to UTIs.

Beware of pyometra

Before ending this section, I do want to mention that unspayed female dogs can get a potentially life-threatening uterine infection called a pyometra. This would be another non-anal gland reason that the back end of a female dog would smell like fish.

Sometimes the infected material is all trapped in the uterus. But other times, the dog will have a stinky vaginal discharge due to the infected material draining out of the body. A dog with a pyometra may urinate more frequently (just like a dog with a UTI), experience vomiting or diarrhea, run a fever, or be lethargic.

Pyometra is a medical emergency. If you are seeing these signs and think your dog could have a pyometra, get your dog to the vet right away for an emergency vet visit.

Fishy odor #4: Skin and ear yeast infections

Finally, sometimes it can be hard to localize where the fishy smell is coming from. This is especially true if it’s a large area like your dog’s skin or a place you might not think to sniff like the ears. If you are left wondering “Why does my dog smell like fish?” and it isn’t any of the other causes we talked about so far, it could be yeast overgrowth.

A veterinary assistant holding open an infected ear of a dog, which may smell like fish
Inflamed, infected ears can have a strong fishy odor.

Any dog can suffer from skin conditions that result in a yeast infection. However, certain dog breeds are predisposed. Golden Retrievers, Labradors, Hounds, and Spaniels are all examples of dogs that are frequent fliers in the vet clinic for yeast infections.

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Most commonly, these yeast infections will be in the ears. But in a wrinkly breed such as a Shar Pei or a Bulldog, those adorable folds of skin on the face, legs, and feet are a breeding ground for yeast too. Also, dogs with allergies may be prone to yeasty skin infections between their toes, or in their armpits and groin.

Once the vet diagnoses your dog with an ear infection (i.e. otitis in dogs) or a skin infection, he or she will help formulate a treatment plan. Generally, the vet will recommend anti-fungal ear drops or ointment for ear infections. Most of these dogs do not need oral medications.

In the past, medicated shampoo was one of the mainstays of treating yeast overgrowth on the skin. But for many dog parents, this proved to be difficult. The good news is that now we have topical mousses, sprays, and wipes that have made it much easier to treat yeasty dog skin.

How to prevent fishy-smelling yeast overgrowth

The other neat thing about these new topical products is that they can do a great job of preventing yeast overgrowths too. With dogs that are prone to smelly yeast infections, an ounce of prevention really is worth a pound of cure.

So, in addition to following the specific recommendations of your veterinarian, consider these skin and ear care tips to decrease how fishy your dog smells:

  • Use a veterinary-approved ear cleaning solution weekly and ask your veterinarian to demonstrate how to clean your dog’s ears. Never use alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, or coconut oil in an ear.
  • Clean and dry your dog’s ears after every bath and after swimming.
  • Clean and dry skin folds or deep creases (tail pockets, armpits, between toes) on your dog every few days if he or she is prone to yeast infections. Cotton balls and cotton swabs are highly absorbent, which makes them perfectly suited for this job. Avoid using abrasive paper towels or washcloths to dry these areas.
  • If you have a predisposed dog breed, start a skin and ear care routine in puppyhood rather than waiting for issues to arise.
  • Ask your veterinarian about allergy medicine for dogs if your pup is experiencing more than one yeast infection per season despite good at-home cleaning and management.
  • Consider a hypoallergenic diet or allergy testing if yeast infections are recurrent.
A female owner hugging a small Chihuahua mix on her shoulder.
If your dog seems to have a new strange fishy odor, contact your veterinarian and schedule an appointment!

Talk to your vet

As you have discovered, there are many reasons why your dog may be smelly. Perhaps, like my dog, he or she just likes rolling in stinky things! Keep in mind though that a fishy odor could be related to one of the medical conditions we just finished talking about. This wasn’t an inclusive list, so it is also possible that your dog smells like fish for a different reason.

If you have any concerns about your dog’s health, please make an appointment with your veterinarian. He or she can help get your dog’s dental disease, UTI, anal gland issue, yeast overgrowth or other problems under control. In no time at all, your pup can be feeling—and smelling—a whole lot better.

What was the cause of your dog’s fishy smell?

Please comment below.

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Extra Information About female dog pee smells like fish That You May Find Interested

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Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish? 4 Reasons for a Fishy Odor

Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish? 4 Reasons for a Fishy Odor

  • Author: toegrips.com

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  • Sumary: Why does my dog smell like fish? Dr. Buzby explains that anal gland disease, UTIs, dental disease, or yeast infections might be the culprit.

  • Matching Result: Why does my dog smell like fish? Dr. Buzby explains that anal gland disease, UTIs, dental disease, or yeast infections might be the culprit.

  • Intro: Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish? 4 Reasons for a Fishy Odor Why does my dog smell like fish? If you are pondering (or perhaps googling) this question, then you have come to the right place! Integrative veterinarian Dr. Julie Buzby helps you get to the bottom of your dog’s fishy odor and gives you some solutions that aren’t fishy—and can help your dog smell less fishy too. Depending on your dog’s sense of adventure and level of hygiene, he or she can exhibit any number of odd odors that may lead you to sniff and exclaim, “What did…
  • Source: https://toegrips.com/why-does-my-dog-smell-like-fish/

Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish? | Great Pet Care

Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish? | Great Pet Care

  • Author: greatpetcare.com

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  • Sumary: Wondering why your dog smells like fish? Learn from our vet experts at Great Pet Care about potential causes, possible problems, and how to help dogs smell good.

  • Matching Result: Dogs may develop fishy-smelling urine due to a urinary tract disorder. Urinary tract infections (UTIs), bladder or kidney stones, prostate …

  • Intro: Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish? | Great Pet Care Join thousands of pet parents and get vet-approved guidance, product reviews, exclusive deals, and more! Skip To Dogs just like humans can emit some pretty unpleasant body odors. And one of the worst offenders is when a dog smells like…well…fish.  While we humans work hard to prevent and mask our body odors by bathing frequently and applying deodorants and perfumes, dogs don’t really seem to mind their own stench. After all, dogs are often attracted to things we find putrid such as trash and rotting animal carcasses.   Naturally, dogs…
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Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish? 5 Common Causes ...

Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish? 5 Common Causes …

  • Author: dailypaws.com

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  • Sumary: There are five common causes—mostly coming from your dog’s nether regions.

  • Matching Result: Is the fishy smell coming from your female dog’s genital area? It could be a UTI or a vaginal infection (vaginitis), which your vet can treat …

  • Intro: Does Your Dog Smell Fishy? Cuddling with a dog is one of life’s great joys … but not when your pup reeks. Canines can have a lot of stinky odors like gas, poop, and the notorious wet-dog smell. But perhaps one of the worst is when your dog smells fishy. “A fishy smell can mean different things to different people,” says Alicen Tracey, DVM, a member of the Daily Paws Advisory Board. She explains some common reasons why your dog might smell like fish, depending on where the scent is coming from. 1. Dental Disease Does your dog have death…
  • Source: https://www.dailypaws.com/dogs-puppies/health-care/dog-conditions/why-does-my-dog-smell-like-fish

5 Reasons Your Dog Smells Like Fish - Insider

5 Reasons Your Dog Smells Like Fish – Insider

  • Author: insider.com

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  • Sumary: If your dog smells like fish, it might be a problem with their anal glands or even a UTI — here’s how to treat these issues.

  • Matching Result: If your dog has fishy-smelling urine, it can signify a urinary tract infection, Finn says. This occurs when there is a bacterial overgrowth.

  • Intro: Why does my dog smell like fish? 5 reasons your pooch is pungent The most common reason why your dog can smell like fish is anal gland issues. If your dog’s anal glands are infected, they secrete a fishy, foul-smelling odor. Your dog may also smell like fish if they have certain dental diseases or a UTI. If your dog smells funky, like fish, it’s normal to be concerned. This foul odor can come from their mouth, butt, or what may seem like their whole body.Your dog shouldn’t be smelling fishy, and it’s certainly not pleasant for you as a…
  • Source: https://www.insider.com/guides/pets/dog-smells-like-fish-reasons-why

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Why your dog smells like fish, according to vets - Betterpet

Why your dog smells like fish, according to vets – Betterpet

  • Author: betterpet.com

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  • Sumary: Our expert panel of vets break down why your dog might be emitting fishy smells, what causes it and how you should treat it.

  • Matching Result: Dogs have plenty of natural flora that come from their bladders and reproductive tract. Fishy smelling urine is most commonly caused by a urinary tract …

  • Intro: Why your dog smells like fish, according to vets 🐟 Why does your dog smell like fish? Is there something in the air or is that smell coming from your pup? Here’s what could be causing your dog’s bad fishy odor. Written by Victoria Lancaster — Medically reviewed by Dr. Erica Irish Updated November 28, 2022 table of contents Why does my dog smell like fish? Bad breath Urine stench Anal glands A note on female dogs Preventing fishy smells Dog smells aren’t always fishy The essentials Some dog smells are normal — But not all, and there are a…
  • Source: https://betterpet.com/why-does-your-dog-smell-like-fish/

Why Does My Female Dog Smell Like Fish? (Breath, Urine, Butt)

Why Does My Female Dog Smell Like Fish? (Breath, Urine, Butt)

  • Author: doggysaurus.com

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  • Sumary: Have you ever had that thing when you’re playing with your female dog and suddenly get a whiff of a horribly fishy odor? It’s enough…

  • Matching Result: There are many reasons your female dog might smell of fish. The two most common reasons include blocked anal glands emitting a fishy odor or a vaginal yeast …

  • Intro: Why Does My Female Dog Smell Like Fish? (Breath, Urine, Butt) | DoggySaurusHave you ever had that thing when you’re playing with your female dog and suddenly get a whiff of a horribly fishy odor? It’s enough to make you gag! Even now, all these years later, I can still remember the really intense whiff of fish coming from the behind of my grandmother’s dog when I picked her up for a cuddle.Although the fishy smell is undeniably potent and unpleasant, you can take a bit of comfort of the fact that you aren’t the only female dog owner with…
  • Source: https://doggysaurus.com/female-dog-smells-like-fish/

6 Reasons Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish - ThePets

6 Reasons Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish – ThePets

  • Author: thepets.net

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  • Sumary: Dog Smells Like Fish ☝ Find Useful Tips ➦ ThePets ✔6 Reasons Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish ➣Advice from Carol Young ✔Why do female dogs release a fishy smell?

  • Matching Result: 6. What If my Dog’s Pee Smells Like Fish? … As mentioned above, a urinary tract infection (UTI) can give your dog’s urine a fishy, or unpleasant …

  • Intro: Dog Smells Like Fish: 6 Reasons Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish Written by: Carol Young Carol has worked in specialty, emergency, mixed animal and general veterinary practices, and enjoys all aspects of veterinary medicine. Her special areas of interest include anesthesia, critical care, emergency, dentistry, internal medicine and small animal nutrition. View all 46 articles Learn about our editorial process and veterinary review board. As a dog owner, you may have noticed that sometimes your best friend doesn’t smell the greatest, especially after playing in the mud or rolling in something, and that he may on occasion give…
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Frequently Asked Questions About female dog pee smells like fish

If you have questions that need to be answered about the topic female dog pee smells like fish, then this section may help you solve it.

Why does my female dogs urine smell like fish?

If your dog’s urine smells of fish, has a very strong or pungent smell, or suddenly smells different, then it could be a sign of urinary problems, such as a urinary tract infection, bladder or kidney stones. It’s important that you contact your vet for advice before your dog becomes more unwell.

How do I get rid of the fishy smell on my female dog?

What to Do About Your Dog’s Fishy Smell. If you notice a fishy smell, call your veterinarian. Your dog may simply need his anal glands manually emptied, or expressed, which should resolve the odor. Some dogs, especially small dog breeds, require that their anal glands be expressed regularly.

Why does my dog have a fishy smelling discharge?

Vaginal Infection. Is the fishy smell coming from your female dog’s genital area? It could be a UTI or a vaginal infection (vaginitis), which your vet can treat with medication. Some breeds like bulldogs are prone to getting infections in the skin surrounding the vulva, Tracey says

Do female dogs smell like fish when in heat?

A dog on heat can give off a distinct pungent and fishy smell, thanks to her estrus discharge.

How do I know if my dog has urinary tract infection?

Dogs with UTIs generally attempt to urinate very frequently whenever they go outside. They also may strain to urinate, or cry out or whine when urinating if it is painful. Sometimes you might even see blood in their urine. Dripping urine, or frequent licking of the genitals, may also signal that a UTI is present.

Can I treat my dogs UTI at home?

Adding apple cider vinegar to fresh water twice each day for 10 days can help to treat a mild UTI. Whether you add ACV or not, you need to make sure that your dog is drinking plenty of water. Extra hydration will help to flush the urinary tract system and clear up a UTI.

Do you have to express female dogs glands?

Manually expressing your dog’s anal glands can help relieve discomfort that dogs experience when they are full and can prevent any infections from developing. Expressing anal glands is a smelly?and sometimes messy?part of grooming, so most owners prefer to have it done by a groomer or at the vet clinic.

How do you know if your dog needs his glands squeezed?

Be on the lookout for the following signs: Your dog is scooting on the carpet. Your dog is licking his bottom a lot. If your dog’s glands are really full, they may leak out a stinky, pungent smell.

How often do female dogs need their glands expressed?

Most dogs never need their glands expressed. The fluid is released naturally when they pass stool. However, some dogs will need their glands emptied for them. This can be an infrequent occurrence (once or twice a year) or something that is done every 4-6 weeks.

What happens if you dont Express dogs glands?

If the anal glands are not emptied they can become impacted and an abscess can form, which then bursts through the skin leaving a smelly, bloody, painful mess. This may be a temporary thing, such as during an episode of diarrhea, or it may be an ongoing issue.

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